Return to Website

Alvin Lee Message & Discussion Board

 

We invite you to use this forum to communicate with Alvin's fans around the world, but please do so with respect and goodwill.
We reserve the right to delete any messages we deem offensive.

 

Guestbook

Index > General Discussion > Alvin Lee Message & Discussion Board > Re: Old People's Trivia - Joe Cocker
Forum: Alvin Lee Message & Discussion Board
Start a New Topic 
  
Author
Comment
View Entire Thread
Re: Old People's Trivia - Joe Cocker

To the men's room to do a speedball?

Re: Re: Old People's Trivia - Joe Cocker

HA !!!

Dale, at that time. Belushi was not popular enough to get away with that type of thing.

Years ago, I read the biography of Belushi by one of the "Watergate" writers and it was fascinating. What was fascinating was not so much Belushi, but how, if someone gets celebrity status and personal abuses are taking control, how there are so many around them who excuse it all, help their negative habits. They do whatever because the celebrity is making a lot of money for the TV and movie studios, and that is the priority.

Belushi's abuses were amazing, one both drugs and food.

But Johno was a speedball king !!

Thanks Dale.

Email  
Re: Old People's Trivia - Joe Cocker

Don't know, but in my dream band, Joe Cocker sings and Alvin Lee plays the guitar. Did they ever perform together? I can think of no other singer who can match Joe Cocker's voice, tone-sureness and magic appearence on stage - still to this day. He's as good singer as Alvin is guitarist, IMHO. Imagine a slow blues or a swinging gospel with those two on stage..

Re: Re: Old People's Trivia - Joe Cocker

I would love to see them do a number together, it would be fun. But I think of Joe as more of a Rhythm and Blues guy. I just had a vision of Joe singing Help Me. But, I would rather see the originator singing and playing his the best blues harp in the business, the late Sonny Boy Williamson.

I have always loved really good vocal harmonies, so if Alvin played with some backup singers.

How about Alvin recording with one of my favorites, in their early years, before they had a few top singles, "The J. Geiles Band" !!

If you have never heard J. Giles live album "Full House", it absolutely smokes with incredibly energy and talent. Now they had maybe the most original blues harp player and someone who has the best nick name in Rock/Blues, "Magic Dick". Peter Wolf could sing and play with "off the chart energy", and they knew the blues, real roots blues too.

With the energy that Alvin generates just by himself, and the early J. Geiles, WOW.

I am thinking, who is still alive who really knows how to sing with their heart and soul. Buddy Guy would be fantastic, to play and sing with Alvin. Steve Winwood.
Billy Preston would be nice as well.


Although Alvin abviously more than made up for this, with his talent, prescence and energy, but I would have liked it if TYA would some of the times record or have some singers who could harmonize, just add a little more seasoning to the pot.

Email  
Re: Re: Old People's Trivia - Joe Cocker

Borge,

I got another one who I think would be fantastic to sing with Alvin.

Paul Rogers of "Bad Company", "Free" and others. I just saw him on cable TV from a 2002 "Bad Company" tour and he still has that great voice.

Re: Re: Old People's Trivia - Joe Cocker

Dale,

Although you might be very correct in your answer to the Joe Cocker/John Belushi trivia question, it is not the answer I had in mind.

If anyone WANTS to know the answer, please post it hear and I will tell you what John Belushi did after the show. Another hint is that he went to work.

Re: Re: Re: Old People's Trivia - Joe Cocker

Right I'm going to show off - and probably get it wrong:

Hear Me Calling on Stonedhenge had a harmony, I think it was the producer.

In Flight had a few harmonies from the backing singers.

Pete Pritchard did some harmony in the concert last year at Brighton, can't remember which songs, and I have a vague memory that Edgar Winter joined in at the end.

Finally, didn't Alvin and Mylon LeFevre double up a couple of times on On The Road To Freedom.

OK I'll shut up now, except that I do agree about Joe Cocker. What a fantastic voice.

Email  
Re: Re: Re: Old People's Trivia - Joe Cocker

Hmmmm Cocker.. well each to his own.

Interesting thing, though... In the mid-to-late 60s, many old blues guys toured over here in the UK.. some well-known (I remember seeing John Lee Hooker, Jesse Fuller, Jimmy Reed) and some obscure.. possibly hoiked out of jobs as janitors and waiters... to cash in on awareness brought about by people like the Stones referencing them. But when we bring up names of people who're still around, whose influences hark back to the blues... they're invariably white and more often than not, British. Black artists, and it was black music after all.. had already moved on - into Soul and Motown (at least, those who got famous), mostly, when the blues revival took shape.

Re: Re: Re: Re: Old People's Trivia - Joe Cocker

It is an unfortunate fact of history that most white artists benefited far more from the influence of black music than the black artists that originally created it.

Email  
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Old People's Trivia - Joe Cocker

Don,

Well said and very important to remember.

While most music artists have gotten screwed by their management or record companies, black artists REALLY got screwed.

If one follows the history of blues/rock, it parallels the unfortunate racism that is still so prevelent in the U.S.
I have always felt that Racism of all kinds has been the "achilles" heel of the U.S. and as a citizen and someone who cares deeply about this country, it is important to discuss and be aware of.

I do feel a debt of gratitute for the "British Invasion" artists from The Beatles, to Alvin Lee to The Rolling Stones, Clapton, etc, etc, etc who listened, understood what they were hearing, covered all those songs, added another dimension to that great "American Form" and most importantly, gave credit to and helped promote the artists who inspired them.

Sadly the Brits and Europeans were more exposed to the great American artists than white Americans were.

Jon

PS: Is anyone interested in the trivia question answer ?????

Email