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Index > General Discussion > Alvin Lee Message & Discussion Board > Re: Re: Review of "In Tennessee"
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Re: Re: Review of "In Tennessee"

OK, I think I get your point, although I think you are somewhat inconsistent in saying
"I meant different league....not that one is necessarily better, cause I believe it is impossible to say one is better."
but then also saying:
"In that same "style", I would put Eric Johnson above them."

I also disagree with your central point, and think that there are standards of better or worse, but I do not want to re-kindle a debate I had at Mr. Vai's site about the possibility of aesthetic standards.

Can I take a stab at changing your mind about Mr. Vai? Have you heard tracks 3, 4 and 7 on "Alien Love Secrets"? Of course, the style is different, and perhaps that is the unbridgeable gap...

One has to wonder how fast licks could still impress these days. Mr. Malmsteen has leeched everything out of that brick. On the other hand, fast licks can contribute to effect, can't they?

Finally, knowing that you are a fan of Mr. Lee and a guitar player and apparently also a person of some maturity, judging from your writing style, and thus someone who's had ample time to learn, why am I not surprised that you can play fast? How many hours did you spend in your youth, as I did, trying to learn "I'm Going Home"?

peace

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Re: Review of "In Tennessee"

Toni....Crap may have not been the best word to use...but there is some work where it seemed Alvin was not as inspired as the majority of his work.
Also, when he puts out stuff that is so incredible....one has expectations for all of it to be incredible. I know that is not fair, but it is a reality.

Sorry Alvin.....on a positive note...You are by far the best guitarist I have ever seen live...you have NEVER disappointed when I see your shows....

Speaking of which...when you making it back to San Francisco? Clarence should be available!

Re: Re: Review of "In Tennessee"

I cannot help but detect the unmistakable whiff of smugness in your communications, not least because you deemed it appropriate to advise us of your review, and precisely where it could be found. Thus, I have not read it, nor do I intend to.

Enough can be gleaned from the replies of my fellow 'acolytes' to allow to me to determine that an air of disappointment emanates from your goodself, with specific regard to 'Mr. Lee's' progress as a musician.

You, and many of his devotees have failed, or simply refused to grasp that the said 'Mr. Lee' and his accompanists recorded an album within the strict parameters of 50's style music. Thus, is could quite legitimately be deemed a 'theme' CD, much in way as Clapton's 'Johnson' offerings could be similarly described.

Comparisons therefore with Mr. Lee's past works are therefore pointless, not to mention meaningless. 'In Tennessee' is an exercise, bringing the 50's style into this age, whilst remaining true to it's roots and structure. Including his trademark guitar pyrotechnics would have been anachronistic, in much the same way as wearing a pair of 'Nike Airs' would be in a Capone movie.

This fact seems to have whizzed over the heads of many fans, as well as the casual onlookers, who have not even had the good grace to compliment the musicianship of EVERYONE involved in the album.

Maybe they were disappointed that after a considerable wait for a new CD, their dislike of the 'theme' dissolved their collective ability to appreciate a masterpiece of reproductive art, albeit using 21st century technology, I do not know, nor do I care.

'Mr. Lee' may pay more cogniscence to criticism from fellow musicians, evaluating what may be valid, or otherwise, but only he can enlighten us on that front. Speaking, however, as more of one than the other, your grounds for picking holes in 'In Tennessee' in my book, are decidely shaky.

I could have told you to **** off, but that would not have been British.

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Re: Re: Re: Review of "In Tennessee"

This is like an argument about whether new beer is better than old wine.

Nobody needs to eff off. Life's short enough as it is. Enjoy it while it lasts and just let your feet tap.

Re: Re: Re: Re: Review of "In Tennessee"

So speaketh the voice of reason.

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Re: Re: Re: Re: Review of "In Tennessee"

No, its a very specific argument. Has Alvin grown as a musician or not? Not whether he is better or not, but is he at all different. I agree life is short and we should just enjoy the music, but conversation is frequently about differences of opinion. So, when someone comes in and says something - particularly about Alvin's abilities - that some of us disagree with, you certainly can't expect us to be quiet. Particularly when we were all specifically asked to comment.

Re: Re: Re: Review of "In Tennessee"

Hey, Alan, what's your problem? I have opinions, and I'm prepared to defend them or modify them. If that's smugness to you, then you're looking in a mirror. And if you are insulted because, as a Brit, you didn't like my complimenting your countrymen on the greater temperance than I've experienced on the other side of the pond, you do have a problem.

Having said that, and always being prepared to put the gloves back on, let me respond.

You wrote ---> "I cannot help but detect the unmistakable whiff of smugness in your communications, not least because you deemed it appropriate to advise us of your review, and precisely where it could be found. Thus, I have not read it, nor do I intend to."

I asked for comments, and I am prepared to consider them. One of the others has suggested that I listen to certain specific albums. I appreciated that, and hope to get to it quite soon.

You wrote ----> "Enough can be gleaned from the replies of my fellow 'acolytes' to allow to me to determine that an air of disappointment emanates from your goodself, with specific regard to 'Mr. Lee's' progress as a musician."

Actually, you can get a more accurate picture of my moderate dissapointment from some of my replies; some of the responses seem to ignore what I actually wrote. At the risk of repeating myself ad nauseam -- and I'm only risking it because, again, some people just don't seem to read what I write -- I LIKE THE ALBUM. OK? And I never said that anyone here was an acolyte; I said that I was not. Sheesh.

Your wrote ---> "You, and many of his devotees have failed, or simply refused to grasp that the said 'Mr. Lee' and his accompanists recorded an album within the strict parameters of 50's style music. Thus, is could quite legitimately be deemed a 'theme' CD, much in way as Clapton's 'Johnson' offerings could be similarly described."

Blah, blah, blah. In case YOU missed it, one of my points is that what he plays is not "within the strict parameters of 50's style music." If he wanted to do that, he'd have had to play more like Brian Setzer or Keith Richards. He's still playing like Alvin Lee, a style that he brought to a high state of development by 1969, and which he has not changed to any significant extent for this album. All he's done is surround himself with his heros, and turned his amp down somewhat.

You wrote ----> "Comparisons therefore with Mr. Lee's past works are therefore pointless, not to mention meaningless. 'In Tennessee' is an exercise, bringing the 50's style into this age, whilst remaining true to it's roots and structure."

Is it truly pointless, then, to point out that he hasn't done what you think he's supposed to be doing? Also, since my main criticism of the album is that he hasn't changed I guess, by your lights you figure that I think he failed his exercise. But let me remind you: I LIKE THE ALBUM.

You wrote ----> "Including his trademark guitar pyrotechnics would have been anachronistic, in much the same way as wearing a pair of 'Nike Airs' would be in a Capone movie."

Duh. That's one of the reasons why I referred to the recording of "I'm Going Home" on this album as "unfortunate." Butyou don't know that because you didn't read the review and don't intend to. Duh.

You wrote: ----> "This fact seems to have whizzed over the heads of many fans, as well as the casual onlookers, who have not even had the good grace to compliment the musicianship of EVERYONE involved in the album."

Well, I guess then we should go to THEIR fan sites, eh?

You wrote ---> "Maybe they were disappointed that after a considerable wait for a new CD, their dislike of the 'theme' dissolved their collective ability to appreciate a masterpiece of reproductive art, albeit using 21st century technology, I do not know, nor do I care."

You're not talking about me here, are you? Let me say it again, I LIKE THE ALBUM

You wrote ---> "Mr. Lee' may pay more cogniscence to criticism from fellow musicians, evaluating what may be valid, or otherwise, but only he can enlighten us on that front. Speaking, however, as more of one than the other, your grounds for picking holes in 'In Tennessee' in my book, are decidely shaky."

On what front, and why only Mr. Lee? And how do you know whether I "picked holes" or instead talked broad brush, or what were the grounds for doing whatever I did if you have not, and do not intend to, read the review? DUH! Let me say it again, I LIKE THE ALBUM. The end of the review says that it is a GOOD album for the guitar afficionado, and a GREAT album for the more casual listener. OK?

You wrote: ---> "I could have told you to **** off, but that would not have been British."

But it IS British to do so in that backhanded way, is it? My, my, and I had had such a nice impression of the folks on this board before.

Finally, in case you find my referring to professional musicians as "Mr." so-and-so to be smug or stuffy (ha-ha, that's the pot calling the kettle metal, now isn't it?), let me explain. I'm not Mr. Lee's friend; I've never met him, and don't even know whether or not he'd like me if I did. I am simply trying to show respect, rather than pretending to some false familiarity by calling him "Alvin" or reducing him to a fleshless abstraction by calling him "Lee." Hope that clarifies things.

Peace

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Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Review of "In Tennessee"

Well I'm going to leave you folks to it. I love Alvin... but some of you act like you're the Keepers of the Sacred Flame.

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Review of "In Tennessee"

Thanks, Toni, your point is well taken, and your comments, in large part, appreciated. As I recall, you are the only one so far to point out specific albums and specific songs that I might want to listen to for evidence of growth.

Thanks again.

Peace

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Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Review of "In Tennessee"

Ah, akc, of course some of act like we're the keepers of the Sacred Flame - we're fans of many many years standing , and fans have a tendency to think of their heroes as something, well, as something heroic. On a personal level, we all know Alvin is human and has human flaws just like the rest of us - but on a musical level, we put him above most others. It's why we gather on this site and its why we pay homage to him. Certainly, we don't expect everyone to share our views - but good heavens, you can't honestly expect that we won't come to Alvin's defense when we think he's been judged unfairly!

Re: Review of "In Tennessee"

How dare you speak to me in that tone, you with your peanut butter breath and high school yearbook hairstyle! I take great exeption to your demeanor, and I don't have a problem....at least nothing that I find affects the way I walk.

You created the anomoly, not me, not Toni, not anyone...you did it all by yourself, praising the album....but then...oh no! You had to go and spoil it all by saying something stupid. OK, so you liked the album, but why detract from your obvious good taste. AL put the shackles on himself, playing within the bounds of the style...with the exclusion of 'I'm Going Home' as you so astutely point out..Duh!

Your use of the word 'acolyte' was not an inference to anyone here?...apologies are accepted here gratiously, no matter how well disguised...and Oh yes, you liked the album.

I must take issue with your point regarding the 50's style. By a fortunate chain of events I was able to listen to the album very early on, and was asked here, for my opinion. My reaction was to say 'think Brian Setzer, and you're not far away.' That was my first instinct, maybe you would ridicule such sentiments, but I stand by it as being as close as AL might want to get, intentionally, or otherwise...and Oh yes, you liked the album, I'm getting to grips with that now.

With regard to AL's accompanists, very complimentry remarks were made here regarding Pete Pritchard, Scotty Moore, D.J. Fontana, and Willie Rainsford....but from those whose taste the CD didn't suit?....not a peep of compliment...not the merest toot of appreciation...nor even the merest squeak of acknowledgement..bad form, very bad form indeed, Paul. Did you say you liked the album? Oh yes, you did didn't you.

Finally, and without any prejudice, well maybe a little, I apologise for tarnishing your impression of the Board, it was completely unintentional. My intention was to pull your chain with only a modicum of ferocity...mission accomplished....Double Duh!!

Please, by all means listen to the recommended albums, I'm certain you'll enjoy them. Let us know what you think.....if you dare!

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Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Review of "In Tennessee"

'akc' this is a debating chamber, I suppose, as well as meeting point for fans of the whole spectrum of interest in Alvin Lee and classic TYA.

Like any place of debate, things might be said that don't suit everyone. Just because this is on the internet doesn't mean that representatives of differing opinions and different character won't be here, just like they are in the pub or at work.

Things get aired here that I'm not necessarily comfortable with, but I just keep schtum, I don't flounce away in the 'cream puff'.

Stay around please! Enjoy the banter, and squirm at the sucking up if you must, but never let the Board detract from your enjoyment of the music.

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Re: Re: Review of "In Tennessee"

Come on guys,Chill out.If you like the music, just enjoy and if you don't, sell the CD and find something you do like.

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Re: Re: Re: Review of "In Tennessee"

I'm at a loss at akc and Graeme's basic advice that we chill out. What is it we're doing??? If we forgo all conversation on this board - and conversation is all it is - I may as well shut the darn thing down. When did the people here get so thin skinned that simple - and quite civil - differences of opinion cause such rankled feelings?

Sheesh....anyone wanna discuss the Cream reunion? Did they grow as musicians? Did they play anything different? Were they boring??

Re: Re: Re: Re: Review of "In Tennessee"

That'll be three no's and a yes, Boss.

As Toni suggests Graeme, what's all this about being nice to each other? It would be very dull if we all agreed all of the time. But as long as heated discussion remains civil, and everyone eventually agrees with me, there will be no problems.

Nobody gets hurt....well, maybe the odd feeling here and there, and a few egos might get dented...but that's all. It's better than going to watch the Jam Tarts or the Hibees, surely?

Note to non-Scots: Don't even ask!

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Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Review of "In Tennessee"

alan
now we could have some very heated discussions on hibs and hearts but i think we are on the wrong forum.as regards chilling out,i just thought we had overplayed the arguments and it was going nowhere.rock on

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Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Review of "In Tennessee"

Geeeez, leave you guys alone for a few days and goe to Disneyland and what happens? LOL!

Time for my belated two cents worth - and no you don't get change!

Anybody looking for something "new" in a Rockabilly album in which the artist has an honest appreciation of, and is trying to capture the "roots" of, 50s rock and roll isn't going to find what they are looking for. And it's silly to even search.

Alvin was not out to show anybody how much technical powress or "new" innovations he has in his playing. Nor was he out to compete with a whole slew of fleet fingered axe slingers.

Alvin set out to make a d@mned fine rockabilly album. In Tennessee is a ****ed fine rockabilly album. Objective achieved. End of discussion.

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